In IA Thought, Information Architecture

What we do: “Giving inhabitable form to society’s most intricate abstractions, processes, and organs of information.”

Our friend Matt Burton sent this to us back in October. We finally took a minute to consider it.

Wow.

As an architect, I am interested in my profession and its future, and
I think one can safely say this: cyberspaces will require constant
planning and management. The structures proliferating within it will
require design, and the people who design these structures will be
called cyberspace architects. Schooled along with their brethren
“real-space” architects and urban designers, cyberspace architects
will design electronic edifices that are fully as complex, functional,
unique, involving, and beautiful as their physical counterparts–if
not more so–and the ways that these are disposed in the electronic
landscape.

Theirs will be the task of visualizing the intrinsically
non-physical and giving inhabitable form to society’s most intricate
abstractions, processes, and organs of information. And all the while
they will be re-realizing in a virtual world, in cyberspace, many
vital aspects of the physical world, in particular those orderings and
pleasures which have always belonged to architecture and the
artifactual landscape.

No architect has ever yet designed a bank, or a university, for that
matter. They have designed only the physical shell that houses them.
Banks and universities have an informational structure and content
more marvelous by far than any architect can depict or has yet needed
to.

From a 1996 paper by architect Michael L. Benedikt

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